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2018 Poetry Flash Reading Series


Poetry Flash readings take place at Moe's Books, Berkeley, and at Diesel, A Bookstore, Oakland.

To find out more about the Poetry Flash Reading Series, please email editor@poetryflash.org or call (510) 525-5476, weekday afternoons. ASL interpreters for the deaf and hearing impaired may be provided for these events with at least one week's notice. To request, email mbb@poetryflash.org, or editor@poetryflash.org. Our reading series venues are wheelchair accessible. Read more about the series on the Poetry Flash Reading Series page.


18 JANUARY 2018 — thursday

Chris Olander and Kim Shuck

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Chris Olander, River Light, and San Francisco Poet Laureate Kim Shuck, Sidewalk NDN, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Chris Olander's debut book of poems is River Light. Kirk Lumpkin says, "What has always impressed me about Chris Olander's poetry is how present, how kinetically alive the energies of Nature (birds, oaks, rivers, etc.) are in it and of how the words dance in the breath and sinew of it." Chris Olander is a performance poet, teacher, and naturalist, and a California Poets in the Schools poet-teacher and Poetry Out Loud coach.
Kim Shuck is the current Poet Laureate of San Francisco. Her latest publication is the chapbook Sidewalk NDN. Her other books include the books of poems Smuggling Cherokee, for which she won the Diane Decorah first book award by the Native Writers Circle of the Americas, Clouds Running In, and the prose work Rabbit Stories.


25 JANUARY 2018 — thursday

Dan Bellm and Annie Stenzel

Poetry Flash presents a reading by poet Dan Bellm, Deep Well, translator of Speaking in Song (hearing and forgetting), by Pura López Columé, and poet Annie Stenzel, The First Home Air After Absence, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Dan Bellm's new book of translation, Speaking in Song (hearing and forgetting) is from the Spanish of distinguished Mexican poet Pura López Columé; many of her poems in this book have been set to music by composers from Mexico, the United States, and the United Kingdom. His previous translations include the work of Mexican poet Jorge Esquinca and French poet Pierre Reverdy. He has published four books of poems, the latest Deep Well, and his honors include a prize from the Cleveland State University Poetry Center and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the California Arts Council.
Annie Stenzel's debut book of poems is The First Home Air After Absence. Dorianne Laux says, "Sensual, laced with wry wit, her writing shows us how the language of poetry and love will outlast us, speak for us even after the Japanese wisteria has overcome the shingled roof, smothering us with its beauty." Widely published in literary journals both in print and online, she works at a law firm in San Francisco.


28 JANUARY 2018 — sunday

Chana Bloch Tribute: Jeanne Foster, Sandra Gilbert, Peter Dale Scott, more

Poetry Flash presents a Tribute Reading for Chana Bloch, Invocation to Daughters, by her Writing Group: Dan Bellm, Jeanne Foster, Sandra Gilbert, Peter Dale Scott, Phyllis Stowell, and Alan Williamson, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

This tribute to the late poet Chana Bloch is a reading by six members of her close knit Writing Group. It is also a celebration of her posthumous book of poems, The Moon Is Almost Full; copies will be available at the event. Chana Bloch was a poet, translator, and teacher for many years at Mills College; she was much beloved in the Bay Area and beyond. Jane Hirshfield says of her new collection, "Each page verifies the beauty and scope and surge of a life both extraordinary and daily, embraced not in spite of our mortality, but because of it." The book will be available that this event. The readers from her Writing Group will be:
Poet and translator Dan Bellm, whose most recent book of poems is Deep Well.
Poet and translator Jeanne Foster's most recent book of poems is Goodbye, Silver Sister. She is professor of English and Creative Writing at Saint Mary's College in Moraga.
Poet, memoirist, critic, and teacher Sandra Gilbert, among whose recent books of poems is Belongings.
Former Canadian diplomat, poet, political thinker, and memoirist Peter Dale Scott, among whose books of poems is Coming to Jakarta: A Poem about Terror.
Poet, teacher, editor, and founding member of Saint Mary's College of California MFA program Phyllis Stowell, among whose books of poems is Sundered.
Poet, critic, and teacher Alan Williamson's most recent poetry collection is A Pattern More Complicated: New and Selected Poems.


1 FEBRUARY 2018 — thursday

Iris Jamahl Dunkle and Phyllis Meshulam

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Iris Jamahl Dunkle, Interrupted Geographies, and Phyllis Meshulam, Land of My Father's War, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Iris Jamahl Dunkle's new book of poems is Interrupted Geographies. Camille T. Dungy says, "While Iris Jamahl Dunkle writes specifically about particular places and people—some famous and some little known—there's no way to read these poems without understanding the ways she is always writing about you and also about me." She is the current Poet Laureate of Sonoma County, and her second collection, There's a Ghost in this Machine of Air, is about the untold history of Sonoma County. Her debut collection, Gold Passage, was selected by Ross Gay for the Trio Prize from Trio Press and was published in 2013.
Phyllis Meshulam's new book of poems is Land of My Father's War. Fred Marchant says, "In this book, the literal 'land of my father's war is Italy, where the poet's father served in World War II…However, the landscape of these beautifully crafted poems is wider than any one country, and deeper than any one moment in time. Phyllis Meshulam maps the landscape of consciousness in our time…" She is also author of the chapbooks Doll, Moon and Valley of Moon. Widely published in literary journals, she is anthologized, too, in the acclaimed anthology Veterans of War, Veterans of Peace. She is a teacher and the coordinator of both California Poets in the Schools and the nation-wide youth recitation series Poets Out Loud.


15 FEBRUARY 2018 — thursday

Hadara Bar-Nadav and Dean Rader

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Hadara Bar-Nadav, The New Nudity, and Dean Rader, Self-Portrait as Wikipedia Entry, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Dean Rader's new book of poems is Self-Portrait as Wikipedia Entry. ZZYZZYVA says, "By writing honestly about the difficulties of self-representation, Rader represents himself as a writer who cares deeply about his audience and his craft." His debut collection, Works & Days, won the T.S. Eliot Poetry Prize, and his chapbook, Landscape Portrait Figure Form, was named one of the Best Poetry Books of the Year by the Barnes & Noble Review. He's editor of the anthology 99 Poems for the 99 Percent: An Anthology of Poems, and a co-editor of Bullet into Bells: Poets & Citizens Respond to Gun Violence. He's also written several academic books, including Engaged Resistance: Contemporary American Indian Art, Literature, and Film from Alcatraz to the NMAI.
Hadara Bar-Nadav's new book of poems is The New Nudity. Amy Gerstler says, "The New Nudity gives voice to the souls of objects. In these dark, spoken still lives, personification becomes a kind of conjuring, a mystical art rife with nuance." Her previous collections include Lullaby (with Exit Sign), The Frame Called Ruin, and A Glass of Milk to Kiss Goodnight. She's also co-author of the best-selling textbook Writing Poems. She's received fellowships and awards from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Society of America.


18 FEBRUARY 2018 — sunday

Susan Cohen, Lucille Lang Day, Judy Halebsky, Mary Mackey, more

Poetry Flash presents a reading and launch celebration for Know Me Here: An Anthology of Poetry by Women, edited by Katherine Hastings, with readings by contributors Susan Cohen, Lucille Lang Day, Miriam Bird Greenberg, Judy Halebsky, Elizabeth C. Herron, Mary Mackey, Connie Post, Julia Vose, Laura Walker, and Kathleen Winter, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

Know Me Here: An Anthology of Poetry By Women is edited with an introduction by poet and radio host Katherine Hastings, founder of the WordTemple Poetry Series and host of WordTemple on NPR affiliate KRCB FM. She is the former Sonoma County Poet Laureate. Her most recent book of poems is Shakespeare & Stein Walk Into a Bar.
Readers for the event include contributors:
Susan Cohen, whose second book of poems is A Different Wakeful Animal.
Lucille Lang Day, publisher of Scarlet Tanager Press and author of ten poetry books and chapbooks, most recently Becoming an Ancestor, two children’s books, and a memoir.
Miriam Bird Greenberg, author of In the Volcano’s Mouth, winner of the 2015 Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize for Poetry.
Judy Halebsky, author of two books of poems, Tree Line and Sky=Empty, which won the New Issues Prize.
Elizabeth C. Herron, member of PEN, Fellow of the International League of Conservation Writers, and author of four chapbooks and a book of short fiction.
Mary Mackey, author of seven books of poems, including Sugar Zone, winner of a PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award, and fourteen novels, one of which made the New York Times Bestseller List.
Connie Post, author of the book of poems Floodwater, winner of the Lyrebird Award; she is also winner of the Crab Creek Poetry Award.
Julia Vose, author of the collection Moved Out on the Inside; she is also the recipient of a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and an Academy of American Poets Prize.
Laura Walker, author of the poetry collections story, Follow-Haswed, bird book, rimertown/ an atlas, and swarm lure.
Kathleen Winter, whose new collection, I will not kick my friends won the 2017 Elixir Poetry Prize.


22 FEBRUARY 2018 — thursday

Brynn Saito and Kathleen Winter

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Kathleen Winter to launch her brand new book, I will not kick my friends, winner of the 2017 Elixir Poetry Prize, and Brynn Saito, Power Made Us Swoon, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)
Berkeley

Kathleen Winter’s new book of poems I will not kick my friends won the 2017 Elixir Poetry Prize; this reading and celebration is the book launch. Bob Hicok says, “Kathleen Winter is unusually attuned to the intersection of the imagined and the common place. She weaves her loves—personal, artistic, intellectual—into her daily life, making this a book of passionate intimacies.” Her first book of poems, Nostalgia for the Criminal Past, won the Texas Institute of Letters first book Award.
Brynn Saito’s new book of poems is Power Made Us Swoon. David Rivard says, “Brynn Saito is committed to seeing what is most human about us, without resort to the tactics of noise and exaggeration. It is not easy to be austerely uncertain and open-hearted at the same time, but she pulls it off beautifully.” Her previous collection is The Palace of Contemplating Departure. She is a winner of the Benjamin Saltman Award, was a finalist for a Northern California Book Award, and is a recipient of a Kundiman Asian American Poetry Fellowship and a Poets 11 award from the San Francisco Public Library. 


18 MARCH 2018 — sunday

So Many Voices: Kim Shuck, Gail Entrekin, Joseph Zaccardi, more

Poetry Flash presents a reading and celebration for So Many Voices, a Poetic Matrix Press twentieth anniversary anthology edited by John Peterson, James Downs, and Joe Milosch, of writings published by Poetic Matrix Press authors from 1997-2017, contributors reading: Kim Shuck, Gail Entrekin, Charles Entrekin, James Downs, Joseph Milosch, Leroy F. Moore, Jr., Patricia Nelson, Chris Olander, and Joseph Zaccardi, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

So Many Voices is a new anthology celebrating Poetic Matrix Press’s twentieth anniversary, selecting from the work of their authors 1997 to 2017. Edited by John Peterson, James Downs, and Joe Milosch, with a foreword from James Downs and John Peterson, the writings in So Many Voices were gleaned from sixty Poetic Matrix Press books by forty-five ethnically and aesthetically diverse authors, including selections of women’s studies and literary nonfiction. Contributing authors reading at the event:
James Downs is author of the poetry collection Merge with the River.
Gail Entrekin and Charles Entrekin; her most recent book of poems is Rearrangement of the Invisible; she is co-author with Charles of the poetry collection The Art of Healing; his most recent book of poems is Portrait of a Romance; he was the founder of the Berkeley Poets Cooperative and the Berkeley Poets Workshop and Press.
Joseph Milosch is author of The Lost Pilgrimage Poems.
Leroy F. Moore, Jr. is a Black disabled activist, poet and writer, hip-hop lover, and feminist, author of author of Black Kripple Delivers Poetry & Lyrics.
Patricia Nelson is an attorney and environmentalist, author of the book of poems Spokes of Dream or Bird.
Chris Olander is a performance poet, teacher, and naturalist whose first full-length book of poems is River Light.
Kim Shuck is the current Poet Laureate of San Francisco; her books include the poetry collections Smuggling Cherokee and Sidewalk NDN and the book of poetic fiction Rabbit Stories; her heritage is Tsulagi, Sauk, Fox, and Polish. She is the first Native American poet laureate of a major American city.
Joseph Zaccardi is a former Marin County Poet Laureate; his fourth book of poems is A Wolf Stands Alone in Water.


29 MARCH 2018 — thursday

Ivan Argüelles, Jack Foley, Jacob Smullyan

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by surrealist poet Ivan Argüelles, poet and KPFA "Cover to Cover" radio host Jack Foley, and poet, writer, and publisher Jacob Smullyan, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Ivan Argüelles is an acclaimed surrealist poet, whose collection Looking for Mary Lou: Illegal Syntax won the William Carlos Williams Award in 1989. Recent books of poems include Fragments from a Gone World, Duo Poemata: Ilion—a Transcription & Altertumwissenschaft, and Fiat Lux. He is the founder and co-editor of Pantograph Press.
Jack Foley has published fifteen books of poems, five books of criticism, and Visions and Affiliations, a 'chronoencyclopedia' of California poetry from 1940 to 2005. Recent collections include Riverrun, about which Stephen Cole says, "Sad, exhilarating and imaginatively original true adventure in Poetry!" Grief Songs, which will be the focus of this reading, is a collection of elegies for Adelle, his wife of almost fifty-five years, a poet herself and his partner for years in performing his unique 'multi-voiced' poetry. Grief Songs and The Tiger and Other Tales, his collection of short stories, were both published by Sagging Meniscus Press. Foley is host of "Cover to Cover," his poetry radio show on Wednesday afternoons on KPFA-FM.
Jacob Smullyan's new book of prose poems is Errata. Charles Holdefer of Dactyl Review says, "To describe a book as unclassifiable is, of course, to classify it, but that fact is entirely in keeping with the spirit of Jacob Smullyan's Errata…" He is also author of the poem cycle Dribble. A musician as well as a writer, he is the founder of Sagging Meniscus Press and Exacting Clam magazine.


5 APRIL 2018 — thursday

Jennifer S. Cheng and Barbara Tomash

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Barbara Tomash, PRE-, and Jennifer S. Cheng, House A, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Jennifer S. Cheng's forthcoming book of poems is MOON: Letters, Maps, Poems, winner of the Tarpaulin Sky Book Award. Jennifer Tseng says, "Each of the voices in Jennifer S. Cheng's MOON speaks as if she's the 'the last girl on earth.' Alone in a vast, constantly changing Universe, she asks urgent questions…With curiosity and attention, MOON shines its light on inquiry as art, asking as making. In the tradition of Fanny Howe's poetics of bewilderment, Cheng gives us a poetics of possibility." Her previous full-length collection is House A; she has also published an image-text chapbook, Invocation: An Essay. Having grown up in Texas, Hong Kong, and Connecticut, she now lives in San Francisco.
Barbara Tomash's brand new book of poems is PRE-. Gillian Conoley says, "Barbara Tomash's terrific new book PRE- reminds us of Emerson's great notion that every word was once a poem…Barbara Tomash opens up the word and the world in these poems." She is the author of three previous collections, Arboreal, The Secret of White, and Flying in Water, which won the 2005 Winnow First Poetry Award. Earlier versions of PRE- were finalists for both the 2016 Colorado Poetry Prize and the Rescue Black Box Poetry Prize.


8 APRIL 2018 — sunday

Lara Gularte and Mary Mackey

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Lara Gularte, Kissing the Bee and Mary Mackey, Travelers With No Ticket Home, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

Lara Gularte's debut book of poems is Kissing the Bee. Vamberto Freitas says, "This is a poetry testifying [to] our perpetual search for self, and also an eloquent voyage in search of inner liberation…Her poetry is consistently one of great erudition, sensuality, and Catholicism's role within the Portuguese-American presence in the United States." Her poetry, inspired by her Azorean heritage, is included in a book edited by Freitas called Imaginários Luso-Americanos e Azorianos; she also traveled to Cuba in 2017 with a delegation of American poets to appear at the Festival Internacional de Poesia de la Habana. She is currently an assistant editor for Narrative Magazine.
Mary Mackey's new book of poems is Travelers With No Ticket Home. B. L. Kennedy, The Gipsy Art Show, says, " Mary Mackey's poetry intertwines English and Portuguese in a brilliant, lyrical meditation on nature, childhood, ad the destruction of the rainforests of the Amazon, and the real and psychological landscapes of travel." She's published fourteen novels, one of which made The New York Times Bestseller List, and a number of poetry collections of which the penultimate, Sugar Zone, won the 2012 Josephine Miles PEN Oakland Award.


26 APRIL 2018 — thursday

Arisa White and Maw Shein Win

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Maw Shein Win, Invisible Gifts, and Arisa White, You're the Most Beautiful Thing That Happened, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Arisa White's new book of poems is You're the Most Beautiful Thing That Happened. Dara Wier says that she's a "tender poet who always brings into view what's strange and unusual and critical for our survival. Her poems consider what it requires to meditate and meet what's unknown without flinching." A Cave Canem graduate fellow, she's also the author of Black Pearl, Post Pardon, Hurrah's Nest, and A Penny Saved. A northwest regional representative for Nepantla: A Journal Dedicated to Queer Poets of Color and creator of the Beautiful Things Project, she curates cultural events and artistic collaborations that center narratives of queer and trans people of color.
Maw Shein Win's debut full-length collection is Invisible Gifts: Poems. Genny Lim says, "Maw Shein Win's poems resonate like post-modern haiku. Her idiosyncratic associations touch the heart and defy the intellect in their koan-like logic and arresting imagery." She is a Burmese American poet, editor, and educator. A frequent collaborator with artists, musicians, and other writers, along with composer and musician Amanda Chaudhary she is part of the musical duo Pitta of the Mind, combining poetry with electronic music; she worked with Los Angeles artist Mark Dutcher to produce the book Ruins of a glittering palace, poetry and images, and her poems are featured in Megan Wilson's mural Flower Interruption in a special exhibition, Flower Power, at San Francisco's Asian Art Museum. She is the first and current Poet Laureate of El Cerrito.


6 MAY 2018 — sunday

Lynne Knight and Beth Spencer

Poetry Flash presents a Sixteen Rivers Press Double Book Launch for Lynne Knight, The Language of Forgetting and Beth Spencer, The Cloud Museum, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

Lynne Knight's new book of poems is The Language of Forgetting. Al Young says, "Lynne Knight's mindful, lyrical The Language of Forgetting reads like a heart-and-soul video, Season One. Against a big backdrop of learn-and-let-go, each poem-episode streams me into her book's majestic mosaic, which I happen to feel as love vs. love." She has published five poetry chapbooks and five full-length collections, the most recent of which is The Persistence of Longing, which was nominated for a Northern California Book Award. Her work has appeared in Best American Poetry; other honors and awards include an NEA grant, a Prix de l'Alliance Française 2006, a Poetry Society of America Lucille Medwick Memorial Award, and the 2009 Rattle Poetry Award. I Know, her translation of Ito Naga's Je Sais, was published by Sixteen Rivers in 2013.
Beth Spencer's debut book of poems, also from Sixteen Rivers, is The Cloud Museum; the book explores two worlds, the persona of a sage named Alice and the persona of the artist Jay DeFeo; Pamela Uschuk says, "Rich in imagist language, Spencer's poems transcend simple explanation as they transform us at many levels. Much as an oil painting accrues power and depth layer by subtle layer, this collection opens out and out, bursting into the essence and vortex of mystery itself." She is the founder and editor of Bear Star Press, publishers of poetry and short fiction by writers in Western states.


10 MAY 2018 — thursday

Jacqueline Berger and Michael Brooks Cryer

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Jacqueline Berger, The Day You Miss Your Exit, and Michael Brooks Cryer, Selected Proverbs, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Jacqueline Berger's new book of poems is The Day You Miss Your Exit. Maria Hummel says, "This strong, shining collection is erected over the ruins of loss—the passing of both Berger's parents, and, along with them, the old analog life of the 20th Century. At turns wry, dark, funny, and hungry for meaning, Berger's poems give new voice to grief and aging at a time when even the ways we remember are changing." She's published three previous collections, The Mythologies of Danger, winner of the Bluestem Poetry Prize and the Northern California Book Award in Poetry, Things That Burn, winner of the Agha Shahid Ali Poetry, and The Gift That Arrives Broken, which won the Autumn House Poetry Prize. Her poetry has also been featured on Garrison Keillor's Writers Almanac.
Michael Brooks Cryer's debut book of poems is Selected Proverbs. Loren Goodman says, "Cryer's linguistic Tinguely machines make us feel so many things we almost forget it's all about the music and romance. Whatever happens, there's great wisdom in these proverbs: now shut up and listen." His chapbook, Channels, Frequencies & Sequences, was published in 2017. He's also an occasional music critic for the Phoenix New Times in Arizona, where he lives.


17 MAY 2018 — thursday

Melissa Stein and C. Dale Young

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Melissa Stein, Terrible Blooms, and poet C. Dale Young, The Affliction, reading from his new collection of linked fiction, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Melissa Stein's new book of poems is Terrible Blooms. The New York Times says, "Ms. Stein reminds us that there is no honey—rough, or otherwise—without the sting." Her first book of poems, Rough Honey, won the APR/Honickman First Book Prize. She's received fellowships from the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, and the National Endowment for the Arts. She's a freelance editor in San Francisco.
C. Dale Young's new book, The Affliction, is his first collection of fiction. Charles Baxter says, "The linked stories in C. Dale Young's The Affliction send us off to a magical location, where the fantastical can seem both miraculous and ordinary. These tales treat life-and-death matters with a beautifully eloquent fervor, and, like the stories of Julio Cortázar, they remind us off how varied and unpredictable short stories, like the world itself, can be." He's published four collections of poetry, most recently The Halo, and his poetry has been anthologized several times in Best American Poetry. He's received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation. He practices full-time as a medical doctor.


24 MAY 2018 — thursday

Carol Muske-Dukes and Jane Mead

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Carol Muske-Dukes, Blue Rose, and Jane Mead, World of Made and Unmade, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

Jane Mead's new book of poems is World of Made and Unmade. The late poet C.D. Wright said, "As the laundry room floods and the grape harvest gets done; as Michoacán waits for another time, her beautiful, practical mother is dying. Ashes are scattered in the pecan groves of her own Rincon, her own corner of the world, and the poet, in elementary script, draws a sustaining record of the only feeling worth the struggle…" She's authored four previous collections, most recently Money, Money, Money | Water, Water, Water, and her honors include a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship, a Whiting Writers Award, and a Lannan Foundation Completion Grant.
Carol Muske-Dukes's new book of poems is Blue Rose. Linda Gregerson says, "Scathing intelligence and an open heart: the most difficult combination in the world, and bountifully manifest on every page. In the birth room, at the death bed, beneath the falling ash of a California wildfire, before the whole, hurt spectacle of an imperiled and beloved world, these poems remind us what it's truly like to see and feel." Author of eight poetry collections, including Sparrow, a finalist for the National Book Award, she's also published four novels, two collections of essays, and co-edited Crossing State Lines: An American Renga with Bob Holman. She was California Poet Laureate from 2008 to 2011.


14 JUNE 2018 — thursday

Gillian Conoley and Paul Hoover

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Paul Hoover from his new collection, The Book of Unnamed Things, with Gillian Conoley, Peace, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Gillian Conoley’s most recent book of poems is Peace. A. Anupama, in Numéro Cinq, says, “White space percolates this lyric, while the current lull in American military actions forms the occasion of this book, Gillian Conoley’s seventh poetry collection. With poems titled “late democracy,’ “[Peace] contrary to history,” and “Trying to Write a Poem about Gandhi,” the work pulls one way and then pushes back another, testing the inner ground for breath.” Others of her collections include The Plot Genie, Profane Halo, and Lovers in the Used World. Her work has been anthologized in Best American Poetry, American Hybrid, and Postmodern American Poetry. Her translations include Thousand Times Broken, Three Books, three previously untranslated books of the French poet Henri Michaux. Founder and editor of the literary journal VOLT, she has, among her honors, four Pushcart Prizes, the Jerome J. Shestack Prize from American Poetry Review, an NEA fellowship, and a Fund for Poetry Award.
Paul Hoover’s new book of poems is The Book of Unnamed Things. Mary Jo Bang says, “Hoover’s concern with language’s representational inadequacy is shared by the L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E poets he’s championed for years.…However, his own poems are more direct, more lyrical, and sometimes seethingly and seductively melancholic. Central to all of them (regardless of language’s irrefutable limitations) is his keen intelligence and laconic wit.” Author of fourteen previous poetry collections, he co-edited with Maxine Chernoff the literary magazine New American Writing and co-translated with her The Selected Poetry of Friedrich Hölderlin, which won a PEN-USA Translation Award. Editor, as well, of Postmodern American Poetry: A Norton Anthology, his honors include an NEA Fellowship, the Frederick Bock Award of Poetry, and the Jerome J. Shestack Prize of American Poetry Review.


24 JUNE 2018 — sunday

Kim Addonizio, Donna Masini, Brittany Perham

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Kim Addonizio, Mortal Trash, Donna Masini, 4:30 Movie, and Brittany Perham, Double Portrait, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Kim Addonizio's latest book of poems is Mortal Trash. Terrance Hayes calls it "Peerless poetry…reliably remarkable clarity, edge, and emotion." This is her seventh collection; she's been a finalist for the National Book Award, received a Guggenheim Fellowship, two NEA Fellowships, and a Pushcart Prize. Among her other publications are four books of fiction and her Bukowski in a Sundress: Confessions from a Writing Life. An occasional presenter for BBC radio, she teaches workshops privately and online.
Donna Masini's new book of poems is 4:30 Movie. Tracy K. Smith says, "Truly inspired…4:30 Movie is a stunning, playful, searing, healing collection that will enlarge the reader and revive something crucial in American poetry." Her two previous collections are Turning to Fiction and That Kind of Danger. She has also published a novel, About Yvonne. The recipient of an NEA Fellowship and another from the New York Foundation for the Arts, she has won a Pushcart Prize and appeared in Best American Poetry 2015.
Brittany Perham's second book of poems, Double Portrait, won the Barnard Women Poets Prize, selected by Claudia Rankine. Eavan Boland says, "This unswerving, ambitious work brings the reader on a wild and thrilling journey. The poems lead into a world where desire, the body, memory and invention are looked at in the bright light of language; nothing forgiven, everything laid bare.…" She is also the author of the full-length collection The Curiosities and, with Kim Addonizio, the chapbook The Night Could Go in Either Direction. A former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, she is now a Jones Lecturer in their Creative Writing Program.


19 JULY 2018 — thursday

Elizabeth Cooperman and Thomas Walton

Poetry Flash presents a reading by Seattle poets Elizabeth Cooperman and Thomas Walton, from their new book, The Last Mosaic, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, (www.moesbooks.com)

Elizabeth Cooperman and Thomas Walton have jointly written and published The Last Mosaic, a 'mosaic' of braided prose segments, celebrating their trip to Rome and weaving their impressions of the "Eternal City." David Shields says, "To be human is to be broken. The Last Mosaic not only explains these ideas; it embodies them. It's also extremely vivid, precise, smart, and galvanizing."
Elizabeth Cooperman is Art Director at PageBoy Magazine, and she is co-editor of the anthology Life is Short—Art is Shorter. Her writing has been widely published in literary journals.
Thomas Walton edits PageBoy Magazine. He's author of the anti-lyric lyric essay This World Is All That Does Befall Us and the chapbook A Name Is Just A Mane. His poetry has appeared in ZYZZYVA, Bombay Gin, and many other journals.


26 JULY 2018 — thursday

William O'Daly and Peter Weltner

Poetry Flash presents a reading by translator and poet William O'Daly, from Book of Twilight his new book of Neruda translations, just nominated for the Northern California Book Award in Translation, and Peter Weltner, The Return of What's Been Lost, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Famed Spanish translator William O'Daly's new book of translation is Book of Twilight, by Nobel Laureate Pablo Neruda, which is Neruda's debut book, never before published in its entirety in the United States. The bilingual collection has just been nominated for the 2018 Northern California Book Award in Translation. His translations include eight other books of poetry by Pablo Neruda. He published a full-length collection of his own poetry, Water Ways, in 2017, with prose and photography by J.S. Graustein. A second collection, Yarrow and Smoke, will appear in 2018. He is a National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, and his poems, essays, and translations have been widely published in literary journals and anthologies. He was profiled by Mike Leonard for The Today Show.
Peter Weltner's latest book is The Return of What's Been Lost, fourteen stories and fourteen 'choral' poems, which, David Morris says, "meditate on loss, personal and cultural, and how mourning embodies in the self, incarnate and haunting, the hugeness of what is missing." He's published five previous books of fiction and six full-length collections of poetry, most recently The Light of the Sun Become Sea. His work has also appeared in some national anthologies, including Prize Stories: the O. Henry Awards, 1993 and 1998, as well as in many literary journals and magazines.


2 AUGUST 2018 — thursday

Martín Espada, Lauren Marie Schmidt, Gary Soto

Poetry Flash presents a reading by poets Martín Espada, Vivas to Those Who Have Failed, Lauren Marie Schmidt, Filthy Labors, and Gary Soto, The Elements of San Joaquin, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

Martín Espada's new book of poems is Vivas to Those Who Have Failed. Sandra Cisneros calls him "the Pablo Neruda of North American authors." Recent collections include The Trouble Ball, The Republic of Poetry, finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and Alabanza, whose title poem has been widely anthologized and performed. In all, he's published fifteen books as poet, editor, essayist, and translator. A former tenants lawyer for the Latino community of the greater Boston area, he's received a Shelley Memorial Award, a Guggenhein Fellowship, and he's just won the prestigious 2018 Ruth Lilly Prize for lifetime accomplishment.
Lauren Marie Schimdt's new book of poems is Filthy Labors. Previous collections include Two Black Eyes and a Patch of Hair Missing, Psalms of the Dining Room, and The Voodoo Doll Parade, winner of the Main Street Rag Author's Choice Chapbook Series. Among her prizes are the So to Speak Poetry Prize, Neil Postman Prize for Metaphor, and The Janet B. McCabe Prize for Poetry.
Gary Soto's a poet, essayist, and novelist. His new book of poems is a revised, updated edition of The Elements of San Joaquin, his first collection, originally published in 1977, about which La Bloga had said, "The poet has an impeccable memory for capturing the music and sounds of his childhood. He carries a heavy sense of nostalgia with…grace…" He has since published twelve poetry collections, including New and Selected Poems, which was a National Book Award finalist as well as three novels and a memoir among other books. He has also received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Guggenheim Foundation.


30 AUGUST 2018 — thursday

Joseph Lease, Donna de la Perrière, Natasha Sajé

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Joseph Lease, The Body Ghost, Donna de la Perrière, Night Calendar, and Natasha Sajé, Vivarium, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Joseph Lease's new book of poems is The Body Ghost. Norman Fischer says, "I really don't know how Joseph Lease does this. Reaches such lyric heights with such deli-cacy. With skillful use of anaphora, and perfect, various open-verse forms transformed page to page, Lease is a tour de force master of prosody." His previous collections include Testify and Broken World. He's received The Academy of American Poets Prize, among other grants and awards, and is a member of the Advisory Board of the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics.
Donna de la Perrière's latest books of poems are Saint Erasure and a chapbook, Night Calen-dar. Andrew Joron says, "Donna de la Perrière's consum-mately crafted lines extend the argument of postmodern lyric into a space of mystery." Her previous full-length collection is True Crime. She received a 2009 Fund for Poetry award.
Natasha Sajé's newest book of poems is Vivarium. Dean Young says, "Resourceful, restless, wit-ty and substantially intelligent—what a rare combination of erudition and nimbleness this group of poems exhibits. Their range is marvelously wide in both form and tone." Her first book of poems, Red Under the Skin, won the Agnes Lynch Starrett Prize, and her second, Bend, was given the Utah Book Award in Poetry. She is also the author of the book of essays Windows and Doors: A Poet Reads Literary Theory.


30 SEPTEMBER 2018 — sunday

Mary Mackey and Maurya Simon

Poetry Flash presents a book launch reading by Mary Mackey, The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams: New and Selected Poems 1974-2018, with Maurya Simon, The Wilderness: New & Selected Poems 1980-2016, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Mary Mackey’s new book of poems is The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams: New and Selected Poems 1974-2018, with an introduction by D. Nurkse. Maxine Hong Kingston says, “Mary Mackey’s poems are powerful, beautiful, and have extraordinary range. This is the poetry of a woman who has lived richly, and felt deeply. May her concern for the planet help save it.” She’s author of seven previous collections, including Sugar Zone, which won the 2012 Josephine Miles/PEN Oakland Award and was a finalist for the Northern California Book Award. She’s also published fourteen novels, one of which was on the New York Times Best Seller list.
Maurya Simon’s new book of poems is The Wilderness: New & Selected Poems 1980-2016. Richard Tillinghast says, “The Wilderness…makes clear what readers of hers over the years have increasingly come to feel—that Maurya Simon’s one of the strongest, most humane, imaginative, compassionate, and flat-out brilliant writers of her generation.” She is the author of nine collections of poetry, and her work has appeared in some two hundred anthologies. Among her honors are a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts and two distinguished prizes from the Poetry Society of America; she has also twice served as a Visiting Artist at the American Academy in Rome.


4 OCTOBER 2018 — thursday

Watershed: Ann Fisher-Wirth and Iris Jamahl Dunkle

Poetry Flash presents a Watershed Environmental Festival Kick Off reading by Ann Fisher-Wirth, Mississippi and The Ecopoetry Anthology, a past featured reader at Watershed, and Iris Jamahl Dunkle, Interrupted Geographies, who is reading at the Strawberry Creek Walk and the Watershed Festival on October 13, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Iris Jamahl Dunkle's book of poems is Interrupted Geographies. She is a featured reader on the Strawberry Creek Walk and the Watershed Environmental Poetry stage on October 13 in Berkeley. Camille T. Dungy says, "While Iris Jamahl Dunkle writes specifically about particular places and people—some famous and some little known—there's no way to read these poems without understanding the ways she is always writing about you and also about me." She is the former Poet Laureate of Sonoma County, and her second collection, There's a Ghost in this Machine of Air, is about the untold history of Sonoma County. Her debut collection, Gold Passage, was selected by Ross Gay for the Trio Prize from Trio Press (2013).

A previous featured reader at Watershed, Ann Fisher-Wirth's new book of poems is Mississippi, a "verbal/pictorial" collaboration with Maude Schuyler Clay, an acclaimed, much exhibited Mississippi-born photographer. Billy Collins says, "Fisher-Wirth's poems are not direct responses to Clay's photographs. Rather, her poems are voices–sometimes down-home, other times, uptown–that offer a complementary way of calling forth the spirit of a particular landscape. The attention of the eye and the ear are both quickened by this winning collaboration." Ann Fisher-Wirth is a poet known for her environmental focus; she is the co-editor of The Ecopoetry Anthology (2013). Her own collections include Blue Window, Five Terraces, Carta Marina, and Dream Cabinet. Among her honors are the Rita Dove Poetry Award, the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Poetry Award, and two Mississippi Arts Commission Poetry Fellowships.


7 OCTOBER 2018 — sunday

Heather June Gibbons and Terese Svoboda

Poetry Flash presents a reading by Terese Svoboda, Anything That Burns You: A Portrait of Lola Ridge, Radical Poet, with Heather June Gibbons, Her Mouth as Souvenir, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Heather June Gibbons's debut book of poems is Her Mouth as Souvenir, which won the Agha Shahid Ali Poetry Prize. A graduate of the Iowa Writer's Workshop, she has also authored two chapbooks, Sore Songs and Flyover. Widely published in literary journals, she has received awards and fellowships from the Academy of American Poets, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and the Vermont Studio Center. She teaches at San Francisco State University.

Terese Svoboda's new book is the prose work Anything That Burns You: A Portrait of Lola Ridge, Radical Poet. Robert Pinsky says, "Radical. Modernist, fiery, glamorous, feminist–adjectives and categories can only gesture toward the enduringly significant life and works of the poet Lola Ridge, whose story has been gracefully told, with her poems lucidly understood by Terese Svoboda." She is the author of six highly acclaimed novels and five books of poetry, most recently Professor Harriman's Steam Air-Ship, as well as Cleaned the Crocodile's Teeth, a translation from the South Sudanese language Nuer. Her opera Wet premiered at L.A.'s Disney Hall in 2005. Among her honors are a 2013 Guggenheim Fellowship, the Bobst Prize, an Iowa Poetry Prize, an O. Henry Award for the short story, and three New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowships.


28 OCTOBER 2018 — sunday

Susan Griffin, Forrest Hamer, Matthew Zapruder, more

Poetry Flash presents a celebration for America, We Call Your Name, the new Sixteen Rivers anthology, with an all-star contributors reading by Susan Griffin, Forrest Hamer, Chiyuma Elliott, Dawn McGuire, Matthew Zapruder, Peter Dale Scott, and Don Stang, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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America, We Call Your Name is a brand new anthology from Sixteen Rivers Press. The featured contributors reading at this event are:
Susan Griffin, Forrest Hamer, Chiyuma Elliott, Dawn McGuire, Matthew Zapruder, Peter Dale Scott, and Don Stang.

Edited by Murray Silverstein, Gerald Fleming, Lynne Knight, Carolyn Miller, Jeanne Wagner, and Helen Wickes, America, We Call Your Name was born in response to the 2016 Presidential election. It combines the voices of poets from across America—from red states and blue states, high schools and nursing homes, big cities and small towns—with the voices of poets from other countries and other times. From Virgil and Dante to Claudia Rankine and Mai Der Vang, from Milton to Merwin, from Po-Chü-i to Robin Coste Lewis, these voices—now raucous, now muted, now lyric, now plain—join together here in dissent and in praise, in grief and alarm, in vision and hope. The 126 poems in this book call out to America in resistance to threats to our democracy and in the resilient belief that this fragile, imperfect form of government can and must be preserved. "These poets have an urgent message to share with you," writes Camille T. Dungy in the foreword. "This message is brand new, and it is also eternal. Read carefully. What you learn here might just save your life."


1 NOVEMBER 2018 — thursday

D. Nurkse and Erin Rodoni

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by D. Nurkse, Love in the Last Days: After Tristan and Iseult, and Erin Rodini, Body, in Good Light, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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D. Nurkse's new book of poems is Love in the Last Days: After Tristan and Iseult. Philip Levine said, "The voice behind these poems…that deepest voice we hear rarely if ever and then only in poems, the voice of those closest to us, those we love and care for and who—because they are human—remain mysteries…No one is writing more potently than this." He is author of ten previous collections of poems. A former Laureate of Brooklyn, his recent honors include a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and a Guggenheim fellowship. He has also written about human rights.
Erin Rodoni is the author of two recent poetry collections: Body, in Good Light, from Sixteen Rivers Press, and A Landscape for Loss, winner of the Stevens Award sponsored by the National Federation of State Poetry Societies. Sandra Alcosser said of Body, in Good Light, "A reader slips into this delicate and gracious book of poems as if into an estuary, subject to the waxing and waning of its subtle currents. Erin Rodoni's generous spirit flows forward as she creates her vision through exquisite and mysterious poems: 'Our muscles are toned to transfer/ gentleness. From lover to child. From stranger/ to self and back again.'" Her poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Best New Poets, Blackbird, Colorado Review, and Poetry Northwest, among others. In 2017, she won the Ninth Letter Literary Award for poetry and The Montreal International Poetry Prize.


11 NOVEMBER 2018 — sunday

Lisa Dordal and Rebecca Foust

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Lisa Dordal, for Mosaic of the Dark, and Rebecca Foust, Paradise Drive, wheelchair accessible, East Bay Booksellers (formerly Diesel), 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Lisa Dordal's new book is Mosaic of the Dark. "A debut poetry collection [that] explores faith and sexuality. Humming with inspired metaphors and everyday relevance, these poems are gems."—Kirkus Review. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize, and is the recipient of an Academy of American Poets University Prize and the Robert Watson. Her poetry has appeared in Best New Poets, Ninth Letter, CALYX, Nasty Women Poets: An Unapologetic Anthology of Subversive Verse, The Greensboro Review, and elsewhere. She teaches at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.
Rebecca Foust most recent book of poems is Paradise Drive, winner of the Press 53 Award for Poetry. Thomas Lux says, "There is great music in these poems, and sonnet after sonnet is masterful. Not since Berryman's Henry have I been so engaged by a persona: Pilgrim, who 'like most of we" is good and bad, hapless sometimes, other times approaching wisdom, always sending deeper and deeper her primary roots." Her previous books include God, Seed: Poetry and Art About the Natural World and All That Gorgeous Pitiless Song. Among her honors are a Foreword Book of the Year Award, an MMM Press Poetry Book Prize, and two Robert Phillips Poetry Chapbook prizes. She is the current Poet Laureate of Marin County.


15 NOVEMBER 2018 — thursday

Indigo Moor and Amber Flora Thomas

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Indigo Moor, In the Room of Thirsts & Hungers, and Amber Flora Thomas, Red Channel in the Rupture, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Indigo Moor's new book of poems is In the Room of Thirsts & Hungers. Camille T. Dungy says, "The interlacing narratives of In the Room of Thirsts & Hungers suggests that our world is nothing so much as a mirror, revealing who we are and have always been. These carefully-wrought and brightly-imagined poems are both timely and timeless." Also a scriptwriter and author, Moor is Poet Laureate of Sacramento. His previous collections are Tap-root and Through the Stonecutter's Window, which won Northwestern University Press's Cave Canem prize. His full-length play Live! at the Excelsior was a finalist for the Images Theatre Playwright Award and has been optioned for a film.
Amber Flora Thomas's new book of poems is Red Channel in the Rupture. Susan Terris says, "Amber Flora Thomas writes about a world where no snake, bat, bug or any animal escapes her focus or her respectful awe. With the same intensity, she examines parents, friends, lovers, and self. Her poems, though often fierce, are gorgeous and lyrical in nature; and there's a mystery to them." Eye of Water, her first book of poems, was selected by Harryette Mullen for the 2004 Cave Canem Poetry Prize. The Rabbits Could Sing, her second, was selected by Peggy Shumaker for the Alaska Literary Series. A recipient of the Dylan Thomas American Poet Prize, the Richard Peterson Prize, and the Ann Stanford Prize, she is a Cave Canem Fellow and faculty member. She was born and raised in northern California.


29 NOVEMBER 2018 — thursday

Persis Karim and Sholeh Wolpé

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Persis Karim, poet and editor, Let Me Tell You Where I've Been: Writing by Women of the Iranian Diaspora, and poet, translator, playwright Sholeh Wolpé, The Conference of Birds, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Persis Karim is a poet, editor, and Professor of Comparative Literature at San Francisco State, where she also directs The Center for Iranian Diaspora Studies. She has edited or co-edited three important anthologies, Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers, co-edited by Anita Amirrezvani; Let Me Tell You Where I've Been: Writing by Women of the Iranian Diaspora; and A World Between: Poems, Short Stories, and Essays by Iranian-Americans, co-edited with Mohammad Mehdi Khorrami. Her own book of poetry, Accidental Architecture, is forthcoming.
Sholeh Wolpé's new book is The Conference of Birds, her translation of Farid Ud-Din Attar's twelfth century epic poem, a classic of Persian literature. Reza Aslan says, "…never before has it been rendered into English with such beauty, elegance, and precision. [Her] translation of this epic is sure to be as timeless as the masterpiece itself." She has also adapted Attar's Sufi mystical allegory of the soul's search for meaning as a play, Conference of Birds, which will be produced at The Ubuntu Theatre Project in Oakland, November 30-December 16, directed by Giulio Perrone. Born in Iran, she is also the author of four books of poems, most recently Keeping Time with Blue Hyacinths, two plays, three books of translation, and three anthologies.


24 JANUARY 2019 — thursday

Fire and Rain: Tiffany Higgins, Jeanne Wagner, more

Poetry Flash presents a reading from the new anthology, Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California, with co-editor Lucille Lang Day and contributors Marcia Falk, Ben Gucciardi, Tiffany Higgins, and Jeanne Wagner, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California, co-edited by Lucille Lang Day and Ruth Nolan, is a powerful new anthology featuring more than 250 poems by 149 contributors, including Ellen Bass, Christopher Buckley, Alison Hawthorne Deming, Camille T. Dungy, Ann Fisher-Wirth, Rebecca Foust, Dana Gioia, Rafael Jesús González, Emily Grosholz, Robert Hass, Brenda Hillman, Jane Hirshfield, Ursula K. Le Guin, Gary Snyder, and David St. John, with a foreword by Dana Gioia and introduction by Jack Foley. Pattiann Rogers, recipient of the John Burroughs Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Nature Poetry, says, “Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California”…is not only a beautiful and thorough anthology but an homage to California, its varieties of landscapes, and the amazing poetry it has evoked. Like no other collection in its focus, it presents for the reader experiences of life and personal perspectives on the region while also providing an invaluable resource for teachers of creative writing and literature and the ecology, habitats, and species of the state.” Reading at this event are contributors:
Marcia Falk is a poet, painter, translator, and Judaic scholar. Her brand new book is Inner East: Illuminated Poems and Blessings. Her previous books include The Book of Blessings: New Jewish Prayers for Daily Life, the Sabbath, and the New Moon Festival; The Days Between: Blessings, Poems, and Directions of the Heart for the Jewish High Holiday Season; and The Song of Songs: Love Lyrics from the Bible.
Ben Gucciardi’s poems have appeared in Indiana Review, Orion, Terrain.org, upstreet, Forklift, Ohio, and other journals. He is a winner of the Milton Kessler Memorial Prize from Harpur Palate, a Dorothy Rosenberg Prize, and contests from The Maine Review and The Santa Ana River Review.
Tiffany Higgins is the author of The Apparition at Fort Bragg, selected by Camille T. Dungy; And Aeneas Stares into Her Helmet, selected by Evie Shockley; and Tail of the Whale, translations from Portuguese of poems by Alice Sant’Anna. Her article, “Brazil’s Munduruku Mark Out Their Territory When the Government Won’t,” appeared in Granta.
Jeanne Wagner is the winner of several national awards, most recently an Arts & Letters Award, a Sow’s Ear Chapbook Prize, and a Sow’s Ear Prize for an individual poem. Her first book, The Zen Piano Mover, won the Stevens Poetry Manuscript Prize. In the Body of Our Lives, her most recent book, was published by Sixteen Rivers Press.


27 JANUARY 2019 — sunday

Devreaux Baker and James M. LeCuyer

Poetry Flash presents a reading by James M. LeCuyer, from his new collection of short stories, Duck Lessons, and poet Devreaux Baker, Hungry Ghosts, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Devreaux Baker's new book of poems is Hungry Ghosts. William Pitt Root says of it, "These poems, each fully individuated from politics or profit, stand in effect as non-violent protests of enormous moment, stalwart beauty." Baker has published four previous books of poetry, out of the bones of earth, Red Willow People, Beyond the Circumstance of Sight, and Light at the Edge; she was also an editor of Wood, Water, Air and Fire: The Anthology of Mendocino County Women Poets. Her honors include the PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Poetry Award. She lives on the Mendocino Coast in Northern California.
James M. LeCuyer’s new book of short stories is Duck Lessons. Richard Michael Levine says, “Lecuyer’s stories, all beautifully written, are at once funny and poignant. He writes like an angel with a devilish grin.” His previous book of short stories is Threnody for Sturgeon; he is also author of the book of poems A Brick for Offissa Pupp.


10 FEBRUARY 2019 — sunday

Kelsay Books: Kathleen McClung, Lenore Weiss, Andrena Zawinski, more

Poetry Flash presents a Kelsay Books reading by Rachel Dacus, Carol Lynn Stevenson Grellas, Eileen Malone, Kathleen McClung, Lenore Weiss, and Andrena Zawinski, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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This reading celebrates poets published by Kelsay Books, whose imprints also include Aldrich Press.
Poet and novelist Rachel Dacus’s collection, Gods of Water and Air, features poems and tales of horseback riding, ballet class, a bipolar rocket scientist parent, and a commercial fishing immigrant community. She is also author of The Renaissance Club, a time-travel novel, and the poetry collections Femme au Chapeau and Earth Lessons. Her writing has appeared in Atlanta Review, Boulevard, Prairie Schooner, The Pedestal, and Valparaiso Poetry Review, as well as in anthologies.
Carol Lynn Stevenson Grellas’s new book of poetry is On the Edge of the Ethereal. Sam Rasnake, editor of Blue Fifth Review, calls it, “a dark and beautiful book filled marvelously with the nature of loss, pain and its evasion, leaving, things left unsaid, ‘inhaling a world gone wrong’…Grellas is a remarkable poet with an unflinching eye and ear for details. The writing is a powerful, rewarding journey, not to be missed.” She is an eight-time Pushcart nominee and a four-time Best of the Net nominee. A Red Ochre Press Chapbook contest-winner, her work has appeared in many magazines including The Yale Journal for Humanities in Medicine. She has published other collections, including her chapbook, Things I Can’t Remember to Forget.
Eileen Malone has published her poetry in over 500 literary journals and anthologies, some of which have earned significant awards, including four Pushcart nominations. Her newest book is It Could Be Me, Although Unsure. Her previous books include Letters with Taloned Claws and I Should Have Given Them Water. She founded and now directs the Soul-Making Keats Literary Competition and its Awards Event at San Francisco Main Library. She has taught for California Poets in the Schools and at Bay Area community colleges, and hosted an online interview show for Cable Access TV San Francisco.
Kathleen McClung’s new book is The Typists Play Monopoly. Almost the Rowboat is her previous collection. Her poems appear widely in journals and anthologies including Southwest Review, Naugatuck River Review, Ekphrasis, Atlanta Review, California Quarterly, and Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California. Winner of the Rita Dove, Morton Marr, Shirley McClure, and Maria W. Faust national poetry prizes, she is a Pushcart and Best of the Net nominee, and associate director and sonnet judge for the Soul-Making Keats Literary Competition. She teaches at Skyline College, where she directs Women on Writing: WOW! Voices Now, on campus. She is a 2018-2019 writer-in-residence for Friends of the San Francisco Public Library.
Lenore Weiss received an MFA in fiction from San Francisco State University where she won the Clark-Gross Award (judged by Paul La Farge) and the Robert Browning Dramatic Monologue Contest. She recently won first prize in the Alexandria Quarterly Press small stories series for her flash fiction chapbook, Holding on to the Fringes of Love. Her three poetry collections form a trilogy about being mortal: Cutting Down the Last Tree on Easter Island, Two Places, and The Golem. In reviewing Two Places, Nina Serrano wrote, “Weiss’ mind travels like the speed of light from the real, to the symbolic and the surreal.”
Andrena Zawinski’s poetry has received accolades for free verse, form, lyricism, spirituality, and social concern. Landings is her recent Kelsay Books collection. In Landings, she presents poems that embrace the worldwide condition of women, immigrants, and the working class alongside reverence for the natural world. Rebecca Foust lauds the collection “as a book that offers wisdom and solace and one you will take comfort in reading again and again.” Her other books include Something About, a PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award winner, and Traveling in Reflected Light, a Kenneth Patchen Prize in Poetry winner.


21 FEBRUARY 2019 — thursday

Christopher Buckley and Gary Young

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Christopher Buckley, Chaos Theory, and Gary Young, That’s What I Thought, wheelchair accessible, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Christopher Buckley’s new book of poems is Chaos Theory. Gerald Stern says, “There is a deep nostalgia here, but also wisdom and common sense, and beautiful writing. I welcome him at his maturest, poet of stardust.” Author of some twenty books of poems, including Star Journal: Selected Poems, Back Room at the Philosopher’s Club, Varieties of Religious Experience, and Rolling the Bones; his honors include a Guggenheim Fellowship, four Pushcart Prizes, two awards from the Poetry Society of America, and two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. He has also edited numerous anthologies, several of them with Gary Young, including The Geography of Home: California’s Poetry of Place and Bear Flag Republic: Prose Poems and Poetics from California.

Gary Young is the author of eight books of poems. His new collection of prose poems is That’s What I Thought, winner of the 2017 Lexi Rudnitsky Editor’s Choice Award. Mark Jarman says, “The warmth and honesty of Young’s poems are as durable as their precision and insight.” Also a printer and a book artist, his print work has been widely shown, including at the Museum of Modern Art and The Getty Center for the Arts. In 2010, he was named the first ever Poet Laureate of Santa Cruz County. Some of his honors include a 2009 Shelley Memorial Award, a Pushcart Prize, a William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts.


28 FEBRUARY 2019 — thursday

Barbara Henning and Maureen Owen

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Barbara Henning, A Day Like Today, and Maureen Owen, Edges of Water, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Barbara Henning's new book of poems is A Day Like Today. Cole Swenson says, "Henning adds a global attention to the grand New York tradition of the frank reportage of daily life, making those mundane details refract in myriad sparkling colors." She has published seven poetry collections and four novels. She has edited a book of interviews, Looking Up Harryette Mullen, and The Selected Prose of Bobbie Louise Hawkins; she was also editor of the poetry/art journal Long News: In the Short Century, from 1990-1995.

Maureen Owen has published eleven books of poems, most recently Edges of Water. A special selection of poems from her book Erosion's Pull is now available in collaboration with work of the New York artist Yvonne Jacquette. Bernadette Mayer says, "In Erosion's Pull, Maureen Owen epitomizes quantum poetics or being in 67 places at one time or The Atomizer." A former editor and chief of Telephone Magazine and Telephone Books and a former program coordinator for The St. Mark's Poetry Project, her work has been widely anthologized, including in Moving Borders: Three Decades of Innovative Writing by Women. Among other honors, she has received a grant from the Fund for Poetry and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.


3 MARCH 2019 — sunday

Keith Emmons and Lisa Rosenberg

Poetry Flash presents a reading by Keith Emmons, Moondrifter Reverie, and Lisa Rosenberg, A Different Physics, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Keith Emmons’s debut book of poems is Moondrifter Reverie. David Landau says, “Moondrifter Reverie invests the anxious 1970s with nobility and even, dare I say, with dignity. [It] recreates the sheer loveliness under the hustle bustle and delivers it fresh, via the poet’s handsome language.” A cum laude graduate of Harvard College, he lived for ten years in a waterfront houseboat community during the 1970s, where he wrote and also designed and built a floating home that won a first place award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Widely published in journals in the Bay Area, he now lives off the grid in the Santa Cruz Mountains.
Lisa Rosenberg’s debut book, A Different Physics, won the 2017 Red Mountain Poetry Prize (both of these books are from Red Mountain Press). Kenneth Fields says, “Trained as a scientist and poet, Lisa Rosenberg brings both disciplines together in ways that are quietly terrifying…In landscape, as beautifully rendered as in any modern writer, she sees the potential for destruction familiar to us in the daily news.…” She holds degrees both in Physics and Creative Writing and served as Poet Laureate for San Mateo County 2017-2018. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford, she’s widely published in literary journals. She also worked as an engineer in the space program, founded a consulting practice, and flew as a private pilot. She has a craft essay forthcoming in The WAVES Anthology about her years in the military-industrial complex.


14 MARCH 2019 — thursday

Scott Edward Anderson and Lucille Lang Day

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Scott Edward Anderson, Dwelling: an ecopoem, and Lucille Lang Day, Becoming an Ancestor, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Scott Edward Anderson's new book of poems is Dwelling: an ecopoem. David Gessner says, "In the spirit of Gary Snyder's Turtle Island and The Practice of the Wild, Scott Edward Anderson leads us on a journey into place and the idea of place…driven by the burning questions of how we find a home on this planet, in this transient, often brutal world, and how we heal through home." He's published two previous collections, FallowField and Walks in Nature's Empire. He's been a Concordia Fellow at the Millay Colony for the Arts and he has received the Nebraska Review Award.

Lucille Lang Day has published ten poetry collections and chapbooks, including Becoming an Ancestor and Dreaming of Sunflowers: Museum Poems. She is coeditor of and contributor to the recently published Fire and Rain: Ecopoetry of California, and Red Indian Road West: Native American Poetry from California. She is also the author of two children's books, Chain Letter and The Rainbow Zoo, as well as a memoir, Married at Fourteen: A True Story, nominated for the Northern California Book Award in Creative Nonfiction. Her poems, essays, and short stories have appeared widely in magazines and anthologies, and her many honors include the Joseph Henry Jackson Award in Literature, two PEN Oakland awards, and nine Pushcart nominations.


17 MARCH 2019 — sunday

Linda Elkin and Steven Rood

Poetry Flash presents a book launch reading by Linda Elkin, Navigation, with Steven Rood, I Say Your Name, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Linda Elkin's debut book of poems is Navigation. Eleanor Wilner says, "The resonant poems of Navigation have their compass set on the heart's true north and, as they move through the darkest times, appear lit from within…these poems make emotion intelligible; they distill and illuminate experience—its splendor, suffering, 'sudden grace.'" Widely published in literary journals and some anthologies, including, Kindled Terraces: American Writers in Greece, she's been awarded writers' residencies at Soapstone and the Vermont Studio Center. Born in New York City, she now lives in Oakland.
Steven Rood's debut book of poems is I Say Your Name, devoted to the memory of both the late, great poet Jack Gilbert and Rood's own psychotherapist. For these many years he's been a member of the writing workshop that Jack Gilbert founded at San Francisco State University in 1967, and he was a primary caregiver of Gilbert's during his last Alzheimer days.


4 APRIL 2019 — thursday

Susan Millar DuMars and Austin Smith

Poetry Flash presents a rare U.S. poetry reading by Irish-American poet Susan Millar DuMars, Naked: New and Selected, and Austin Smith, Flyover Country, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Irish-American poet Susan Millar DuMars is visiting from Ireland for this reading. Her new book of poems is Naked: New and Selected. Poetry Ireland Review says, "Her poetry, influenced by the directness of the American tradition, comes as a breath of fresh air…." She's published four previous collections, which have been nominated for her country's most prestigious awards and featured on Irish radio. She's also the author of the book of short stories Lights in the Distance. Born in Philadelphia, she lives in Galway, Ireland where she lives with her husband, blogs, and directs "Over the Edge," an acclaimed reading series. She also teaches creative writing classes at the Galway Arts Centre and for the Brothers of Charity's Away With Words project. In 2009, the couple was the subject of a documentary by Des Kilbane called Rhyming Couplet, which was screened at the Galway Film Fleadh.

Austin Smith's new book of poems is Flyover Country. Jane Hirshfield says, "Austin Smith's Flyover Country is a book of vital and generative reckoning, one that finds both the intimate knowledge held in large landscapes and the larger knowledges found within intimate places and acts." Author of the previous collection Almanac, he grew up on a family dairy farm in northwestern Illinois, lives now in Pescadero, California, and teaches at Stanford University.


7 APRIL 2019 — sunday

Camille Norton, Barbara Swift Brauer, Maya Khosla

Poetry Flash presents a Sixteen Rivers Press book launch and reading by Barbara Swift Brauer, Rain, Like a Thief, Maya Khosla, All the Fires of Wind and Light, and Camille Norton, A Folio for the Dark, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Three poets launch and read from their new Sixteen Rivers Press books! Barbara Swift Brauer's new book of poems is Rain, Like a Thief, Ellery Akers says, "Barbara Swift Brauer is a poet of wonderful transparency and economy, and evokes the delights of ordinary life as well as the passage of time." Her first collection, At Ease in the Borrowed World, was published by Sixteen Rivers in 2013. A freelance writer, she co-authored the nonfiction book Witness: The Artist's Vision in "The Face of AIDS," with portrait artist Lisa Kirk.
Maya Khosla's new collection is All the Fires of Wind and Light. Pattiann Rogers says, "The tone and stance of the lyrical language bestow on each particular—whether commonplace or unique, pitiful or rapturous, insect-tiny or sky-wide—an aura of the miraculous, each being, each element equally mighty in itself and essential to the whole." Her first book, Keel Bone, won the Dorothy Brunsman Poetry Prize. The current Poet Laureate of Sonoma County, she is also a wildlife biologist and a filmmaker. Her recent film is Searching for the Gold Spot: The Wild After the Wildfire. Her film and fieldwork show that the natural environment, if left undisturbed, can recover from even the most devastating fires, especially in northern California, and her poetry is often inspired by her research.
Camille Norton's new book of poems is A Folio for the Dark, in which she "asks us to contemplate the power of reading and writing in an open-source universe in which books as physical objects are disappearing." Julia B. Levine says, "In her brilliant second collection, Camille Norton creates a deep and lush interior world where she is both reader and writer, young girl and sensual adult, herself and other. In these poems, which are as mysterious, brutal, and beautiful as truth, Norton writes her way into the lives of those she has read: Poe, Thomas Jefferson, Gertrude Stein, a Confederate prisoner, Herman Melville's whale, and the Old Testament's Jonah…there emerges an alchemical voice of the multiple worlds that inhabit Norton's dynamic mind." Her first collection, Corruption, was a National Poetry Series winner. She has worked collaboratively with artists and composers since the early 1990's when she co-edited Resurgent: New Writing by Women, an anthology of experimental writing by women in literature, film, and the visual arts. Her poem "The Prison Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone" was published in The Best American Poetry 2010.


11 APRIL 2019 — thursday

Sally Ashton and Arlene Biala

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Sally Ashton, The Behaviour of Clocks, and Arlene Biala, one inch punch, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Sally Ashton's brand new book of poems is The Behaviour of Clocks. Amy Gerstler says, "Ashton's investigative meditations maintain constant awareness of territories shared by physics and poetry. These wonderfully reflective poems arise from something like a physicist's precision of mind and a shaman's sensitivity of vision." She is author of three previous collections and assistant editor of They Said: A Multi-Genre Anthology of Contemporary Collaborative Writing. Editor-in-Chief of DMQ Review, an online journal featuring poetry and art, she also served as Poet Laureate of Santa Clara County from 2011-2013. Her honors include fellowships from Arts Council Silicon Valley and a Lucas Artist Residency at Montalvo Arts Center.

Arlene Biala's new collection is one inch punch. Juan Felipe Herrera says, "Arlene Biala chants and dances at the center of inner-outer sacred lakes; her texts move at the incredible heights of Pele, the ancient Goddess." Her previous collections include two chapbooks and the full-length her beckoning hands, winner of a 2015 American Book Award. Daughter of immigrants from the Philippines, she was raised in San Francisco. A Pinay poet and performance artist, she has performed widely, collaborating with Herrera, Dolores Huerta, Barbara Jane Reyes, and others. She also received a Montalvo residency and served as Poet Laureate of Santa Clara County, 2016-2017.


25 APRIL 2019 — thursday

Nicholas Friedman and Laura Glenn

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Nicholas Friedman, Petty Theft, winner of the New Criterion Poetry Prize, and Laura Glenn, When the Ice Melts, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Nicholas Friedman’s debut poetry book, Petty Theft, is the winner of this year’s New Criterion Poetry Prize. B.H. Fairchild says, “As the political life of the nation descends further into lies and doublespeak, there is a poet in California who remembers the art of poetry, practices it superbly, and so, like Keats, is able to offer us the music of Truth ‘proved upon our pulses.’” Currently a Jones Lecturer in Poetry at Stanford University, he is a former Wallace Stegner Fellow and the recipient of a Ruth Lilly Fellowship from the Poetry Foundation.
Laura Glenn's new book of poems is When the Ice Melts. Alice Fulton says, "No poet better expresses the way in which our physical, literal position in the world changes our perception of the world…a vision so profound and riddling, I was reminded , at times, of Dickinson." Her first collection is I Can't Say I'm Lost. Widely published in literary journals and several anthologies, she's also a visual artist and lives in Ithaca, New York, where she works as a freelance editor.


28 APRIL 2019 — sunday

Grace Schulman and Rosa Lane

Poetry Flash presents a reading by acclaimed poet and memorist Grace Schulman, Without a Claim, and Rosa Lane, Chouteau's Chalk, winner of the Georgia Poetry Prize, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Rosa Lane's new book of poems, Chouteau's Chalk, is the winner of the Georgia Poetry Prize. Dawn McGuire says, "In Chouteau's Chalk, Rosa Lane becomes a lionhearted singer of the erotic: as life force, as madness, as mentor, as inventor…Lane's technical mastery serves the fierce music of the body, which, like desire itself, did bring me to my knees." Her previous collections are Tiller North and Roots and Reckonings. She an architect as well as a poet, and she splits her time between coastal Maine and the San Francisco Bay Area.
Grace Schulman's new book of poems is Without a Claim. Philip Schultz says, "Without a Claim is a modern book of Psalms. Indeed, the glory in these radiant sacred songs meld an art of high music with a nuanced love of the world unlike any we've heard before." She'll also be reading from her newly published memoir Strange Paradise: Portrait of a Marriage, which tells the moving story of her love for her scientist husband, her care for him during a long, terminal illness, and her subsequent harrowing grief. Author of seven books of poems, including this new one and Days of Wonder: New and Selected Poems, which was a Library Journal Best Book of the Year, she is a Distinguished Professor of English at Baruch College, a former director of the Poetry Center at the 92nd Street Y, and a former poetry editor at The Nation. Her honors include a Frost Medal for Distinguished Lifetime Achievement in American Poetry, the highest award of the Poetry Society of America, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and four Pushcart Prizes.


9 MAY 2019 — thursday

Carolyn Tipton and Stephen Kessler

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Carolyn Tipton, The Poet of Poet Laval, and Stephen Kessler, Garage Elegies, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Stephen Kessler's new book of poems is Garage Elegies. Author of several previous collections, he is an all-around man of letters, perhaps best known as a translator from Spanish: his translations of Luis Cernuda have won the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Men's Poetry, the Harold Morton Landon Translation Award from the Academy of American Poets, and the PEN Center USA Translation Award. His version of Julio Cortázar's Save Twilight: Selected Poems won a Northern California Book Award. He is also the editor and principle translator of The Sonnets by Jorge Luis Borges. Author of one novel, The Mental Traveler, he has edited numerous magazines and newspapers, including The Redwood Coast Review, four-time winner of the California Library Association's PR Excellence Award.
Carolyn Tipton's debut book of poems is The Poet of Poet Laval. She is also a noted translator from Spanish. She has translated two books of poems by Rafael Alberti: the first, To Painting: Poems by Rafael Alberti won the National Translation Award; the second, Returnings: Poems of Love and Distance, won the Cliff Becker Translation Prize. Among her honors are fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Endowment for the Arts.


19 MAY 2019 — sunday

Willis Barnstone and Tony Barnstone

Poetry Flash presents a reading by acclaimed poet and translator Willis Barnstone, Poets of the Bible, with his son and noted poet and translator Tony Barnstone, Pulp Fiction, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Willis Barnstone is a poet, teacher, memoirist, editor, and translator; he's published more than eighty books. He'll be reading from his Poets of the Bible and his new, not yet published translations of Guillaume Apollinaire. His books include The Restored New Testament, The Poetics of Translation, and the poetry collections Stickball on 88th Street, and Mexico in My Heart, New and Selected Poems. A Guggenheim fellow, he has been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry four times, and has had four Book of the Month Club selections. His poetry has appeared in The Paris Review, The New Yorker, Poetry Magazine, The New York Review of Books, and The Times Literary Supplement. His books have been translated into diverse languages including French, Italian, Romanian, Arabic, Korean, and Chinese. He was awarded the Northern California Book Awards' Fred Cody Lifetime Achievement Award in 2015.
Tony Barnstone, Willis's son, is also an acclaimed poet, editor, translator, and fiction writer as well. He is the author of seventeen books, including Pulp Sonnets, Beast in the Apartment, The Golem Of Los Angeles, Tongue of War: from Pearl Harbor to Nagasaki, selected for the John Ciardi Prize by B.H. Fairchild, and a poetry and music CD by the same name. B.H. Fairchild said, "…The diction and syntax are often blunt with the exhaustion and terror of human voices—American and Japanese, soldiers and civilians—struggling to articulate the unspeakable, to make visible that to which we have learned to blind ourselves.…I cannot help but think that having read it, an American President who has himself been privileged to avoid the horrors of the battlefield might be less inclined to send young men and women off to face them." His honors include fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, the Poet's Prize, and the Benjamin Saltman Prize from Red Hen Press.


30 MAY 2019 — thursday

Jennifer Elise Foerster and Chad Sweeney

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Jennifer Elise Foerster, Bright Raft in the Afterweather, and Chad Sweeney, Little Million Doors, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Jennifer Elise Foerster's new book of poems is Bright Raft in the Afterweather. Joy Harjo says of it, "We are adrift in mythic waters that hold the possibility of rebirth even as they float the remains of human destruction." A member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation of Oklahoma, Jennifer Foerster has published one previous collection, Leaving Tulsa. She received a 2017 National Endowment of the Arts Fellowship, a Lannan Foundation Writing Residency Fellowship and is a former Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.
Chad Sweeney's new book of poems, winner of the Nightboat Poetry Prize, is Little Million Doors. Kazim Ali, the prize's judge, says, "Still and spare, Little Million Doors is a book-length series of lyrics that mourns a dead father…Perhaps ghostly but never disembodied, these lyrics feel immediate, necessary and absolutely brand new." He has published five previous collections, and two books of translation, the selected poems of the dissident Iranian poet H.E. Sayeh (from the Farsi with Mojdeh Marashi) and Pablo Neruda's final book, Calling on the Destruction of Nixon and the Advancement of the Chilean Revolution. His poetry is widely published in literary journals and has been included in Best American Poetry, The Pushcart Prize Anthology, and Verse Daily. He is the editor of Days I Moved Through Ordinary Sounds: Teaching Artists of WritersCorps in Poetry and Prose and Iroquois elder Maurice Kenny's posthumous collection of poetry and prose, Monahsetah, Resistance, and Other Markings on Turtle's Back.


2 JUNE 2019 — sunday

Francesca Bell and Lee Rossi

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Francesca Bell, Bright Stain, and Lee Rossi, Darwin's Garden, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Francesca Bell's debut book of poems is Bright Stain. Ellen Bass says, "Francesca Bell's poems are fierce and tender, passionate, compassionate, disturbing and delightful." The former poetry editor of River Styx, she is a translator as well as a poet; among her translations is a collection of poems by the Palestinian poet Shatha Abu Hnaish. Her work is widely published in literary journals and magazines, including B O D Y, ELLE, Massachusetts Review, New Ohio Review, North American Review, Poetry Northwest, Prairie Schooner, Rattle, and The Rumpus.
Lee Rossi's new book of poems is Darwin's Garden: Studies from Life. Marsha de la O says, "Much as Darwin walked his 'thinking path' in his garden at Down House in Kent, Lee Rossi teases out the hidden structures of experience in his remarkable work on childhood, bearing the freight of ancestors, masculine codes, sex, religion, and the not-so-tender mercies of nuns, and parents." He has published three previous collections. A critic and a poet, his essays and poetry have been widely published in literary journals; he is a member of the Northern California Book Reviewers and a Contributing Editor for Poetry Flash. A former editor of Tsunami (1986-1992), he studied for five years to be a Roman Catholic priest before leaving the seminary and devoting himself, as he says, "to the study of failure."


6 JUNE 2019 — thursday

Susan Kelly-DeWitt and Mary B. Moore

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Susan Kelly-DeWitt, Spider Season, and Mary B. Moore, Amanda and the Man Soul, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Susan Kelly-DeWitt's latest book of poems is Spider Season. Jane Mead says, "The poems in Susan Kelly-DeWitt's Spider Season reflect our human desire to weave inner and outer worlds into an ordered pattern: like the spider's web, these poems are delicate, made of strong filament, and vulnerable." She's published many previous collections, most recently The Fortunate Islands, as well as an illustrated short story The Audience. A former Stegner Fellow at Stanford University, she is a member of the National Book Critics Circle, the Northern California Book Reviewers association, and is a contributing editor for Poetry Flash, and a reviewer for Library Journal. She is also an exhibiting visual artist.
Mary B. Moore's new book of poems is Amanda and the Man Soul. Dorianne Laux says, "This is one of those books that can't be put down, that overwhelms us with the mystery of what it means to be human and alive in a body, to be in possession of a soul, or maybe twin souls." Her recent collections include Flicker, winner of the 2016 Dogfish Head Award, and Eating the Light, a 2016 Sable Books' chapbook winner.


14 JULY 2019 — sunday

Robin Behn and Julie Bruck

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Robin Behn, Quarry Cross, and Julie Bruck, How to Avoid Huge Ships, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Robin Behn's new book of poems is Quarry Cross. Lee Upton says, "Tender, turbulent, witty, elegiac, Quarry Cross is a refreshment to the spirit. Robin Behn shakes out the language to fathom what she calls 'the old harms' and 'needy needs'—those very forces that may shatter any of us…These are bold, mutinous, world-and-word-enchanted-poems." She's published four previous collections, including The Yellow House and Horizon Note. Co-editor of The Practice of Poetry: Writing Exercises for Poets Who Teach, she is also editor of a collection for young writers, Once Upon a Time is the Twenty-First Century: Unexpected Exercises. She's received grants from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.
Julie Bruck's new book is How to Avoid Huge Ships. Sharon Thesen says. "Alert and precise, perceptive and measured, Julie Bruck's poems calibrate situations both grave and brave, serious and hilarious, whilst avoiding the 'large ships' of heavy-handed conclusion." Born in Montreal, she has been a San Francisco resident for more than twenty years. She has published her poems in such journals as The New Yorker, Ploughshares, Maisonneuve, The Malahat Review, and Valparaiso Poetry Review; her work has also appeared in the anthology, The Best of the Best Canadian Poetry, and Poetry Daily. Her third collection, Monkey Ranch, won the 2012 Governor General's Literary Award for Poetry.


4 AUGUST 2019 — sunday

Marsha de la O and Noah Blaustein

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Marsha de la O, Every Ravening Thing, and Noah Blaustein, After Party, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Marsha de la O's new book of poems is Every Ravening Thing. Christopher Buckley says, "Every Ravening Thing presents a matchless intensity and intellectual gift, a fearless investigation into the world amplified by a vision that is both cosmic and detailed in our common suffering." Her previous collections include Antidote for Night, winner of the 2015 Isabella Gardner Award, and Black Hope, winner of the New Issues Press Poetry prize and an Editor's Choice, Small Press Book Award. Other honors are the Morton Marcus Poetry Award and the da Poetry Award. She has published extensively, including recent poems in The New Yorker, the Kenyon Review, and Prairie Schooner. She lives in Ventura, California, with her husband, poet and editor Phil Taggart. Together, they produce poetry readings and events in Ventura County and edit the literary journal Spillway.
Noah Blaustein's new book of poems is After Party. Garrett Hongo says, "Blaustein is as canny as Odysseus returned home and stringing his bow. Vagabond and shining like the sea, his poems drag you to deep undercurrents as you are caught singing in their chains." And Campbell McGrath says, "These are poems full of vivid particularities, poems that know 'it's easier to love/ this world than it is to disappear.' Noah Blaustein is a believer in hard-earned wisdom—'suffering is measured/ by the strength of one's fears'—and a poet of ferocious nostalgia." His previous collection is Flirt, and he is editor of the anthology Motion: American Sports Poems. He lives in Santa Monica, California.


8 AUGUST 2019 — thursday

Grace Marie Grafton and Judy Maher

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Grace Marie Grafton, Lens, and Judy Maher, Dear Circus God, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Grace Marie Grafton's new book of poems is Lens. Tobey Hiller says, "The book is a paean to the nature and majesty of California, to the peoples and animals that have lived within her changing, rich landscape, and to the importance of knowledge, contemplation, and art." She is the author of six previous books of poems, including Jester; Whimsy, Reticence and Laud; and Other Clues. Widely published in literary journals and anthologies, she has also taught for thirty years through the California Poets in the Schools program, winning twelve Artist in Residence grants from the California Arts Council for her teaching. She was awarded "Teacher of the Year" by the River of Words Poetry & Art Competition for K-12 students, sponsored by Robert Hass.
Judy Maher's debut collection is Dear Circus God. Her book is divided into four sections, beginning with circus metaphors and ending at new starting points, with poems of humor and compassion throughout. Born in Asheville, North Carolina to a minister father, she lived with her family in many temporary homes across the country; then she travelled more with her husband, including a three-year adventure in Saudi Arabia. Having raised two children, they've since settled in Oakland, where she's blossoming as a poet.


12 SEPTEMBER 2019 — thursday

Don Bogen and Katie Peterson

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Don Bogen, Immediate Song, and Katie Peterson, A Piece of Good News, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

Don Bogen's new book of poems is Immediate Song. Wayne Miller says, "At once an extended elegy, a meditation on time, and a hard-won articulation of the largeness of small moments. Simultaneously ambitious and understated, these poems are unmistakably of today's America, even as they mine the timeless concerns of loss and memory." He has published five books of poems, including Luster and An Algebra, as well as a critical book on Theodore Roethke and a translation of selected poems of contemporary Spanish poet Julio Martínez Mesanza. His honors include a Discovery Award, The Writer/Emily Dickinson Award from the Poetry Society of America, and grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Camargo Foundation. He is editor-at-large for the Cincinnati Review.
Katie Peterson's new book of poems is A Piece of Good News. Publishers Weekly says, "These poems burst into consciousness: a child meets John Lennon through her mother's tears at his death, knives and scissors are the implements of love." She's published four books of poems, including This One Tree, Permission, and The Accounts, winner of the Rilke Prize. Other honors include a Literature award from the Academy of Arts and Letters, a grant from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, and a fellowship from the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She is the editor of the New Selected Poems of Robert Lowell, and she collaborates on film and artists' books with her husband, the photographer Young Suh.


22 SEPTEMBER 2019 — sunday

Jeffrey Thomas Leong and Brian Komei Dempster

Poetry Flash presents a reading by poet and translator Jeffrey Thomas Leong, Wild Geese Sorrow: The Chinese Wall Inscriptions at Angel Island, and poet Brian Komei Dempster, Topaz, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Jeffrey Thomas Leong's new book is Wild Geese Sorrow: The Chinese Wall Inscriptions at Angel Island, which won the Poetry in Translation Award at this year's Northern California Book Awards. David Wojahn says, "Jeffrey Thomas Leong is a fine poet, and his translations of 70 of the poems are nuanced, affecting, and informed by a haunting but astringent music." Leong began his translations of these wall inscriptions at the Angel Island Immigration Station, by Chinese immigrants detained from 1910-1940, while earning his MFA at Vermont College of Fine Arts. His writing has been widely published in literary journals including Bamboo Ridge, Crab Orchard, Hyphen, and Spillway.
Brian Komei Dempster's debut book of poems, Topaz, received the 15 Bytes Book Award in Poetry in 2014. He edited both From Our Side of the Fence: Growing Up in America's Concentration Camps, which received a 2007 Nisei Voices Award from the National Japanese American Historical Society, and Making Home from War: Stories of Japanese American Exile and Resettlement. His poems have been widely published in literary journals and anthologies, including the North American Review and Ploughshares.


17 OCTOBER 2019 — thursday

Colby Gillette and Lola Haskins

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Lola Haskins, Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare, and Colby Gillette, Hymn Underground, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

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Lola Haskins's new book of poems is Asylum: Improvisations on John Clare. W.S. Merwin says, "Lola Haskins writes with the startling freedom and grace of a kite flying and with the variety and assurance of invention that reveal, in image after image, the dream of the waking world." She has published twelve collections of poetry and three books of prose. Her honors include the Iowa Poetry Prize, two Florida Book Awards, two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Emily Dickinson Prize from the Poetry Society of America. She is also the current Honorary Chancellor of the Florida State Poets Association.
Colby Gillette's debut collection is Hymn Underground. Donald Revell says, "Amidst the empty tumult and febrile, futile clamor of so many poets now, Colby Gillette stands fast and, standing, gives quickening evidence to things imperishable…The phrases of the sun and nomenclature of starlight in the human eye resound with true, with effortless certainty here. These are poems the planet can believe." He is the author of two chapbooks, Without Repair and Red of the Dawnbreakers: Translations of René Char. Widely published in literary journals, he lives in Pittsburgh.


27 OCTOBER 2019 — sunday

Barbara Berman and Zack Rogow

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Barbara Berman, Currents, and poet and translator Zack Rogow, Irreverent Litanies, East Bay Booksellers, 5433 College Avenue, Oakland, wheelchair accessible, 3:00 (510/653-9965, ebbooksellers.com)

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Barbara Berman’s debut book of poems is Currents. Eavan Boland says, “The reach of these graceful, ambitious poems ranges across stars, cities, storms. Their music is both political and deeply private, braiding the two undersongs together in challenging and sometimes wrenching poetry.” She is also the author of the chapbook The Generosity of Stars. Organizer of one of the first independent press festivals in the country in Washington, D. C. in 1979, she reviews poetry for The Rumpus.
Zack Rogow’s new book of poems is Irreverent Litanies. Frank Paino says, “’Everything we hold dear is borrowed,’ writes Zack Rogow, and those sage words are really the summation of these Irreverent Litanies. Whether in technically adept sonnets, ironic free verse, elegies, or straight-out litanies, the poet isn’t afraid to ask big questions.” The author, editor, or translator of twenty books or plays, his poetry collections include The Number Before Infinity and Talking with the Radio: poems inspired by jazz and popular music. He writes a blog, Advice for Writers, read internationally, at www.zackrogow.com.


7 NOVEMBER 2019 — thursday

Maxine Chernoff and Gillian Conoley

Poetry Flash presents a poetry reading by Maxine Chernoff, Under the Music: Collected Prose Poems, and Gillian Conoley, A Little More Red Sun on the Human: New & Selected Poems, Moe's Books, 2476 Telegraph Avenue, Berkeley, wheelchair accessible, 7:30 (510/849-2087, www.moesbooks.com)

MORE ABOUT THE READERS
Maxine Chernoff’s new book of poems is Under the Music: Collected Prose Poems. Peter Orner says, “It is time to acknowledge that Maxine Chernoff is a national treasure…Who has a voice like hers, able to penetrate so deep into the roots of life’s pain and awkwardness and sometime beauty? I could quote any one of these aching, uproarious and, above all, humane pieces and you’d see what I mean.…” Author of more than a dozen books of poetry, including Here, Without, and To Be Read in the Dark, she is also a fiction author and a translator: with Paul Hoover she translated The Selected Poems of Friedrich Hölderlin, which won the 2009 PEN Translation Award. She and Hoover founded and edited New American Writing. Among her honors, a PIP Gertrude Stein Award for Innovative Poetry, a Carl Sandburg Award in Poetry, and fellowships including the National Endowment for the Arts.
Gillian Conoley’s new book of poems is A Little More Red Sun on the Human: New & Selected Poems. The Antioch Review says, “Here we find the peculiarly American matter-of-factness of the small-town exotic coming face-to-face with intellectual high-brow energy. Carson McCullers meets Gertrude Stein.” Among her previous collections are Profane Halo, The Plot Genie, and Peace, which was named a Standout Book for 2014 by the Academy of American Poets and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She published her translations of Henri Michaux, Thousand Times Broken, in 2014, and she edits Volt magazine. Other honors include the Jerome J. Shestack Poetry Prize, a National Endowment for the Arts grant, a Fund for Poetry Award, and a 2017 Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America


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